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Center Innovation Fund: AFRC CIF

Magnetic Active Radiation Shielding System Using Helmholtz Coil Lattices

Active Technology Project

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Magnetic Active Radiation Shielding System Using Helmholtz Coil Lattices
The objective of this proposal is to investigate whether a magnetic active radiation shielding systems can be designed from an optics perspective, where Helmholtz coil lattices act as a magnetic lenses that deflect high energy particles away from a spacecraft. Preliminary calculations show that a unidirectional magnetic field generated with Helmholtz coil lattices can be optimized to achieve the minimum level of deflection required to effectively shield against particles of normal incidence within the GCR energy spectrum. Unfortunately this preliminary analysis is far from complete, and doesn’t incorporate multiple angles of incidence. It does, however, beg the question of whether extremely large magnetic fields are required to provide an adequate level of deflection. With this idea in mind, this proposal aims to address the following research questions: 1) What is the optimal magnetic field configuration for use in a radiation shielding 2) Can this optimal magnetic field configuration be implemented using Helmholtz coil lattices 3) Can a magnetic active radiation shield be optimized to an extent that it no longer requires the use of high temperature superconductors This is different from previous active shielding approaches in that it isn’t contingent upon the use of high temperature superconductors and large magnetic fields. With that said, its purpose isn’t intended to be in direct opposition to high temperature superconductor approaches. Determining an optimal field configuration would be beneficial regardless of whether its implemented with superconductors. More »

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