Skip Navigation
SBIR/STTR

Mitigating Software Failures with Distributed and Recovery-Oriented Flight System Architectures, Phase I

Completed Technology Project

Project Introduction

Mitigating Software Failures with Distributed and Recovery-Oriented Flight System Architectures, Phase I
The primary focus of Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) has been on faults due to hardware failures. Yet software is growing in complexity, controls critical functionality under a wide range of conditions and does so with greater autonomy. Furthermore, software errors have negatively impacted major missions. Runtime recovery from software faults is gaining momentum in research community with major efforts such as the IBM autonomic computing effort and the Stanford/Berkeley Recovery-Oriented Computing project. We propose application of these methods to flight software in the context of JPL's Mission Data System (MDS), an integrated systems and software architecture for next-generation space missions. Specifically, we consider: ? Detection and repair of radiation induced Single Event Upsets (SEU) that can either change data values or code. ? Recovery from bugs manifested as the use of computational resources outside of a specified mode-dependent resource profile. ? Software organization and infrastructure to help diagnose and limit the impact of errors. We shall study how to restructure MDS as a distributed system with redundant hierarchical components. ? A recovery strategy based on component-level rebooting. This STTR is a cooperative project between the small business Kestrel Technology and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). More »

Primary U.S. Work Locations and Key Partners

Project Library

Share this Project

Organizational Responsibility

Project Management

Project Duration

Light bulb

Suggest an Edit

Recommend changes and additions to this project record.

This is a historic project that was completed before the creation of TechPort on October 1, 2012. Available data has been included. This record may contain less data than currently active projects.

^